Kitchener Stitch Without A Needle

Well almost!

Kitchener stitch is a great way of joining or grafting two sets of stitches together without leaving a visible seam. This makes it perfect for closing off toes on socks.

Socks are often my on the go project, and more than once I’ve been ready to graft a toe together so I can free up my pins for sock two – but I don’t always carry a darning needle.

This method will give you exactly the same finish, and you’ll be left with an end which can be darned in when you and your darning needle meet again.

Cut your working yarn leaving a tail of 30cm / 12 inches

Start by splitting your stitches between two pins and make sure you have the same number of stitches on each. You’ll also want to make sure that the stitches from the sole are on one needle and the top of the foot on the other, unless you want a final twist to your sock. The wrong side of your work should be on the inside. You’ll need one other pin to knit with.

The working yarn should just have knitted the last stitch on the back needle.

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The next two steps are setting up for grafting across the toe and are worked once

Step 1

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Insert your knitting pin into the first stitch on the front pin as if to knit, knit this stitch but leave the stitch on the front pin and pull the working yarn all the way through.

Step 2

IMG_0659

Insert your knitting pin into the first stitch on the back pin as if to purl, purl this stitch but leave the stitch on the back pin and pull the working yarn all the way through.

Now that you’ve set up for grafting there are 4 steps which you work though. Each time you repeat these steps you’ll have one less stitch on both the front and back needle.

Step 1

IMG_0663 you’ll lose one stitch from the front and back pins.

Insert your knitting pin into the first stitch on the front pin as if to purl, purl this stitch, pulling the working yarn all the way through and drop the stitch from the front pin

Step 2

IMG_0663

Insert your knitting pin into the first stitch on the front pin as if to knit, knit this stitch but leave the stitch on the front pin and pull the working yarn all the way through.

Step 3

IMG_0664

Insert your knitting pin into the first stitch on the back pin as if to knit, knit this stitch, pulling the working yarn all the way through and drop the stitch from the back pin

Step 4

IMG_0665

Insert your knitting pin into the first stitch on the back pin as if to purl, purl this stitch but leave the stitch on the back pin and pull the working yarn all the way through.

Continue working these 4 steps until you have two stitches left, one each on the back and front pins.

IMG_0668

There are two final steps to finish off the grafting.

Step 1

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Insert your knitting pin into the first stitch on the front pin as if to purl, purl this stitch, pulling the working yarn all the way through and drop the stitch from the front pin

Step 2

IMG_0677

Insert your knitting pin into the first stitch on the back pin as if to knit, knit this stitch, pulling the working yarn all the way through and drop the stitch from the back pin

IMG_0679

You’ll be left with a beautifully grafted toe and and end that can be darned in at some future date. The slightly loose loop will tighten up when you darn your end in.

Now you can cast on for sock number two – or start on a whole new pair.

I hope this is useful – please let me know what you think.

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3 Responses to Kitchener Stitch Without A Needle

  1. Pingback: Episode 35: Cast Offs For Socks | Shinybees

  2. Sarah says:

    This makes perfect sense – wonderful!

  3. aknitica says:

    I love this! It’s so sensible and yet inspired. Thanks so much for sharing it with us! I’m going to show everyone I know. 🙂

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